Sunday, November 9, 2014

Hammond Multiplex Shuttles Typing Samples



10 C.P.I.

10 C.P.I.

170, 10 C.P.I.

10 C.P.I.

This may also be 170, 10 C.P.I.

10 C.P.I.

10 C.P.I.

170

10 C.P.I.

10 C.P.I.

10 C.P.I.

170

Shuttle positioner

shuttle positioner showing all the dirt I need to remove.

Shuttle holder in loading position. It sits on the two pins shown on the positioner.

Top view

Shuttles loaded

Shuttles in position

Everything is in its home positon and ready to type.  Shuttle to be used is at the top of the photo and the one that can be moved into position by lifiting up on the knob and turning the whole assembly 180 degrees is in the bottom of the photo.
Testing the shuttles turned out to be quite a challenge.  Most do not have numbers on them to verify the typeface.  All are 10 c.p.i. even though the characters differ in size.  Several of the shuttles did not get tested as they do not freely slide around the holder.  By hand I cannot feel any sticking, but the mechanism will jam when they are used. Several others are duplicate typefaces.

This took most of the day.  I tried to get the shuttles that would not slide easily to slide.  This was taking too long so they are tagged and repairs may happen later.
In doing the work I forgot to scale each sample with a one inch line and mark the name and number of the shuttle if I could cross reference it to my previous post.

Now if I can only complete the final challenge; finding the date of manufacture.  It may be 1915, 1916, or maybe even 1918.  The serial number and cast machined aluminum frame and the Typewriter Database places it in 1915 as a Multiplex portable with a different case.  This one is portable and has the square case like the folding model (not the neat curved case as the older models). On line I have not found a Hammond Multiplex verses a Hammond Multiplex portable.  They all look the same size.  I've a tremendous amout of learning to do with the history of these machines if I choose to dig into it.

This is a fun typewriter to use once I mastered the unique touch.  Not a hard touch, a unique one.  Not very fast though.  If I were to compare the speed of this one to a modern one I would say it is about as fast as my SM3, SM7 & SM9 Olympia typewriters.  However the touch may be more like my Remington Noiseless Model 7.

Now to get a purple ribbon for it.  I may never use the black one I ordered.

8 comments:

  1. These all look really classy.

    Some Hammonds give you the option of changing the cpi -- there may be a switch on the right that lets you do this.

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    1. I can't find anything that I have not yet found that already does something.

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  2. Owning both a Hammond no 2 and the Olympias you mention I find myself hard pressed to say one can type as fast on the Hammond as one can on the Olympias. I actually find the touch on my Hammond to be better than the Remington Noiseless, because the Hammond hammer bar is spring driven.

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    1. My SM4 is nice and snappy. I need to intentionally type slower than normal on all my other Olympia typewriters. My SM9 is like new, but still a slow machine. My biggest problem with typing on my Hammond is remembering where the odd locations of some symbols are placed and the two shifts.

      I like the touch on the Hammond better than my Noiselss, but I do not know what else to compare it to.

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  3. Wow! A new journey. Of course I have admired Multiplexes from a distance but they aren't too common in the UK. The type samples are excellent and I'm sure some diligent tinkering will get your sticky shuttles flying again.

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    1. I was very fortunate to find this one and be able to pay for it. It is a neat machine to use. Only complaint is the very heavy carriage return. I do hope to get all the shuttles shuttling.

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  4. Very interesting post today and past two on your gorgeous Hammond aquisition Bill, it looks like it's becoming a favourite :) You were wondering if they had any typewriters and pens at the market I went to on Saturday, the answer to that is a very resounding YES.. and I did think anout taking some photos for you but I got distracted by all the pretty things :)

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    1. This typeweriter is fun to use. I doubt it will replace my Underwood as my go-to typewriter because the mechanics seem quite fragile and in order to get replacements I'd need to buy a too-expensive-for-me parts machine.

      Not many typewriters at any of our local sales. Sometimes an electric. Last neat item I bought was nearly a year ago, a switch blade. They are legal in Florida as long as they are not concealed when you carry them.

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