Sunday, October 19, 2014

Latest Addition to the Collection: Hammond Multiplex


I got a bit dyslexic when I typed.  Z is on the LEFT, left side does not work.  Right side works.  I'm real good at makng typos.  When I grow-up I will learn to type!


The inside of the case has a neat velvet like lining. Outside of the case is falling apart.  On top of the velvet is a very nice Hammond Multiplex with the same problem Robert Messengers has.

My old Olympus does not like to rebalance the white level. 


From what I can find from The Typewriter Database this machine is from 1915 to 1918 since the next numbers start with 1919 and a different serial number designator.  There is not much in the database or on line about these machines.  I did find more on the real old ones, but this era machine, next to nothing.


This side is good at typing z. In fact that is all it will type and I did not buy it in Australia from Robert M.

This half of the keyboard works fine.


Das Springenwerks.
Das Gearenwerks

Mystery Lever.  Whatzitdu?

This thumbscrew was loose in the case.  I have no idea where it goes.


I was hoping to typecast from this typewriter, but I cannot get the right side of the keys to type anything but a z or a Z.  I found a video clip on Robert Messengers blog where he shows the same problem with his Hammond.  I thought it would be better to link his post because he explains much more about these neat typewriters than I post here.

As soon as I get a H.F. Transceiver off the work bench I hope to take this one apart and see what makes it go.  I may stumble onto the cause of the problem or I may just reassemble it and let it alone as I do not even know how to work one of these machines let alone repair one. 

I have much more to post on this typewriter in a future typecast and hopefully it will be typed with the Hammond.

For my German speaking readers I do apologize for my broken German.  It is a habit of the Pennsylvania Dutch where I grew-up.  We'd make words for what we would not know and some how everyone understood.  I like having fun with words every now and then. 


16 comments:

  1. I knew it! It was a Hammond! I just love these. My machine is fully functioning, and so maybe I can compare to see what is wrong. First of all, the mystery lever is used as a bell warning. You can slide it around based on how many spaces you would like to warn you of the end of the line. The hammer hits this lever, usually a few times, and you know when your line is up. This bell clapper is not attached to the margin, but is manually set. The screw looks to be the ribbon winding screw, which ought to be attached somewhere in the middle of the right side of the machine. It is quite handy in winding the ribbon. The problem with the keyboard may be attributed to a bent lever towards the top of the turret. There are two of these, and they push forward and swing the anvil. As you stated, Mr. Messenger seemed to have a similar problem. You do not even need to take the cover off the find these levers, just look directly down the turret.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Make that the middle of the left side for the ribbon screw...

      Delete
  2. The Hammond box is pretty much a give away on their machines, but when mine was made they used the same box for the non-folding machine and the folding one.

    I thought maybe the little lever was for the bell, but when I would run the carriage across I never saw it activate anything for the bell. The bell does sound though.

    I looked at the levers that move the shuttle. I did not take mine out to examine them as Robert did. I suspected it may be the same since he noticed that with his. I do not think it woule be difficult to match the levers back to the original with a bit of trial and error on a small vise or arbor press. I've reformed much worse things at work.

    I am really impressed at the mechanics behind these machines. It is one of the things that drew me to these machines when I first started collecting. I never had one before because I will not pay Ebay prices plus shipping to get one (or any typewriter with a high price), Same reason I do not have a Mill.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. With regards to the bell, It is worked by the impression hammer hitting against it when traveling to the back of the paper, not necessarily by carriage movement. Maybe that offers a solution?

      Delete
    2. Also, they really are mechanical wonders. It has been said that Hammind engineers over-engineered their typewriter so much, that each screw is a size bigger than necessary, in order that it may be easier to take it apart. Really, the only wear on mine is found on the type shuttle, as it is rubber. I am actually missing a piece of the semi-colon. I tried to put a metal Vari-Typer shuttle in, but it would not slide properly. It still looks nice and functions well, though!

      Delete
  3. Also, impression strips can be fastened from a relatively thin strip of rubber, such as the strip used to protect bicycle inner tubes from the spokes. Make sure it is not tight as a piano wire, but also not drooping. When typing, make sure the paper holder is almost 90 degrees up, and the paper goes under the 2 "fingers." I am trying to reference to the wire thing above the paper table. This is not a pleasant convenience, but necessary for proper impression. Carriage throw on the Hammond is supposed to be very heavy, as the mainspring both advances the carriage and works the hammer.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Wow! It looks gorgeous, and so does that velvet. Excellent addition to your collection, and I'm sure you're going to get it working 100% with good advice from folks like Jake. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are too kind! Most of my knowledge came from you, or hours of experimentation. I just don't want other typospherians to have as much difficulty figuring out about this typewriter, which has so little information available about it.

      Delete
  5. Bill:
    Great post and pictures. Hope you get things working. GEE

    ReplyDelete
  6. Cricket. That's an absolutely beautiful machine. What w score!

    ReplyDelete
  7. OMG This is like typewriter royalty Bill, how fabulous to find it, I can tell that you're pretty excited :)

    ReplyDelete
  8. Do you have a Greek shuttle for it, by the way?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes I do. Please see my post from last week. The ones I have are the 4th down in each column. I do not know if they are complete or the only ones ever made for my machine, but they have the characters I use most. All I need to do is get the left side of the key board working and get or make a new impression strip to use them.

      Delete
  9. i quite like this pennsylvania dutch! beautiful machine, I am sure you can get it to work perfectly.

    ReplyDelete
  10. I enjoy older machines for their sculptural quality, and your lovely Hammond is no exception.

    ReplyDelete